The biggest secret to growing your service business

secrets growing service business

secrets of growing service business

Do these 5 things right every time and your business will never stop growing

I’m often asked by clients to help them grow their service business. I nearly always tell them that growth is easy in a business based on services, anyone can grow a small business.

All you need to do is this:

  • Deliver what you promise
  • At the time you promise it
  • For the price you promise it
  • For a profit and
  • With a smile.

Every time…

That’s all… Honestly

If you do those 5 things, every day, customers will break down your doors, because so few small businesses do.

Most small businesses fail doing those 5 things consistently and stunt their growth, because of the classic problem of small business growth:

Scale-ability.

It’s easy when you’re small

You see, when your business is small, you and a couple of people delivering all the services, be it plumbing, washing machine repairs, fixing cars, bookkeeping, designing websites or building houses, then it’s easy to manage and be in control of everything. You can make sure things happen the way you want them to happen.

Once you start to grow with 5, 10 or more employees, and you have a number of teams, or vans on the road, suddenly you’re not in touch with everything that goes on anymore. You don’t even get to meet all the customers and you won’t personally see all the services that get delivered. You have to rely on others, and hope they do things the way you want them done. That they communicate with customers they way you expect them to and that they take their dirty boots off before they traipse in through the house.

Managing by keeping your fingers crossed.

And guess what? It doesn’t work. Your customers start being less than happy, they start looking elsewhere, you’ll believe you need to lower your prices to keep them and it all becomes a dog’s game.

So here’s the biggest secret of all to growing your business:

Learn to say no.

Learn to say no, until you can handle the growth. Never taken on any work, any new business, unless you are confident you can deliver it to those 5 standards above.

If you do that, you’ll be in control of your business, you won’t have to compromise on price and you will build a Beautiful Business and Life. And the customers? They’ll keep coming. There is never a shortage of customers for businesses who deliver on all of their promises, with a smile… I promise you.

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The Rhythm of Business

swiss clock cropped

cuckoo clock

Predictability and Swiss Clocks

How would you like to predict the future?

The holy grail of business is to have a business that behaves like a Swiss clock… Tick TockTick Tock… No surprises… it just works, day in day out. Clients walk in the front door… every day, Tick Tock… the products or services get delivered out the backdoor… every day, Tick Tock… The invoices get sent by the bookkeeper… every day, Tick Tock… and the money drops into the bank… every day, Tick Tock, Tick Tock.

Is that your dream too? Do you dream of Swiss clocks?

Fun Businesses Have Rhythm

A Fun business that sustains you for years to come has rhythm, because with rhythm comes predictability and that’s precisely what you are looking for: to know with a fair degree of certainty what is going to happen tomorrow, next week and next month means you can plan and prepare and be pro-active.

Think about it… If you knew with a high degree of accuracy how many contracts you’d sign next month, or how much money would come in the door, or how many widgets you’d produce, or how many emergency callouts you’d have or warranty repairs you’d have to carry out… What difference would that make to how you managed your business and how much Fun you’d have in your business?

If you knew for sure that 3 months from now your business would have 25% more work to carry out than you have right now, you can start looking for the right people now and have them ready for the onslaught in time, instead of managing in crisis, madly running around trying to find someone at the last minute and begging everyone to stay back to finish the work… I know what situation I’d rather be in, don’t you?

Two Mechanisms of Business Predictability

But how can you know all that? Predicting the future is crystal ball gazing, right? The best you’ll ever do is guess, right?

Well no. You can predict the future in business through two mechanisms:

  1. Measuring
  2. Meeting

Measuring / Dashboard Management

business dashboard ‘Measuring’ is about taking regular measurements of various systems in your business and looking for trends. I often refer to this aspect of business as “dashboard management” and I have written about the topic extensively in various other places, for example here: https://www.newperspectives.com.au/numbers/ , so I won’t get into further detail about numbers and measurement right now but it is important to know that ‘Meetings’ without ‘Measurement’ are a waste of time… you need both to build predictability into your business.

Meetings

So the second mechanism is about meetings. A business that sustains you for years to come will have a schedule of regular meetings, daily, weekly, monthly, annually. It can be no other way.

The size of the business will determine the number of meetings but an average small business in a single location based around a service, profession or trade with 5 to 15 employees will likely have a 15-minute catch up at the beginning of each day at a team level; a weekly 1-hour production team “Work in Progresss (WIP)” meeting and a weekly company-wide half hour “huddle”. The last two meetings may be expanded into more comprehensive meetings at the start of every month.

Besides these meetings there may be regular sales team meetings and management team meetings, and last but certainly not least, individual progress or performance meetings between managers and their direct reports, ideally no more than monthly but certainly no more than quarterly.

Jamie’s Panel Beating Shop

spray paint To illustrate what I’m talking about I’ll tell you about a client of mine called Jamie who owns a panel beating and spray painting business and who I worked with a few years ago:

Jamie employed about 18 people and the business ran from brushfire to crisis and back to brushfire most of the time, things used to go wrong and profits tended to get lost in the daily and weekly efforts to fix the things that went wrong.

When Jamie and I started working together we quickly realised that the crises were usually caused by a lack of effective communications throughout the business and a lack of cooperation amongst different sections of the business.

So Jamie started by implementing a weekly staff breakfast on Friday mornings. At those times the business would open a little later than normal and a nice spread was laid out for breakfast and everyone took part. At the breakfast Jamie would facilitate discussion amongst his staff to a set agenda that always included a recap of the week… what went well last week, what didn’t go so well last week… and a plan for the next week to address the question: What can we put in place as simple actions that will help us improve next week.

Jamie couldn’t believe how quickly things started to improve. Literally in weeks, he noticed a drop off in crises and the mood in the shop just totally changed.

At the end of that quarter, Jamie couldn’t believe his eyes when he printed out his profit and loss report that showed an increase in net profit of 20% over the previous quarter. Suspicious about the accuracy of the numbers he decided to wait and see what the next few months looked like and the numbers were just as staggering. After 4 months Jamie also noticed that the backlog had shrunk by 50%.

A couple of years later, Jamie has extended the lessons from those first breakfast meetings and has implemented all kinds of rhythms into the business and together with his increased focus on measuring and systems, Jamie’s business actually does run like a Swiss clock these days… Tick TockTick Tock.

Importance of Staff Meetings

huddleA simple weekly breakfast meeting like the one that Jamie instigated in his panel beating shop has two big benefits. First of all it builds team spirit and motivation. For a team to work well together there has to be a certain level of trust and the better you get to know someone the easier it is to learn to trust them.

Most importantly though, the point of a weekly company-wide meeting such as Jamie’s breakfast is that it allows the team to start to become engaged with the company goals. By sharing what went well last week and what didn’t go so well and what to put in place to get the best possible outcomes for the next week, around the table, everyone starts to understand how they fit in the Big Picture and how their efforts have a direct impact on the company as a whole. I refer to these meetings as Huddles. You often see a sporting team doing a huddle before they get onto the field and it’s designed to get everyone on the same page and pulling in the same direction.

The Huddle

Wouldn’t you want your staff to operate like a focused sporting team as well?

A system of formal, regular, structured meeting is an absolute pre-requisite for building a Fun Business that sustains you for years to come… I promise you… Tick TockTick Tock.

Masterminds Observations… More Meetings

verne harnish

verne harnish Business Masterminds Observations

 

Predictability

If you enjoy this article click here to get a copy of one of the “The Ten Truths” books for business owners for free

Another thought about the Rhythm of business and how to make business as predictable as possible from Verne Harnish’ book: “Mastering The Rockefeller Habits”.

Link to Amazon: http://amzn.com/0978774949

Verne says to have more meetings, not less.

Verne believes quarterly strategy meetings with your staff are not enough. You need to have a monthly, weekly and even daily schedule of meetings to ensure that the strategies and deliverables from the less frequent planning meetings are actually carried out.

I know that many management gurus would baulk at that statement, because the amount of money and time wasted in business in meetings is staggering.

But Verne is right. Strategies and plans without regular, formal and structured follow up meetings, never lead to the outcomes you’d hoped.

Do learn how to make your meetings super-efficient though (For example, I know of a company where all meetings are held standing up, so that the meetings don’t take a minute longer than absolutely necessary).

Masterminds Observations… Lunch

verne harnish Business Masterminds Observations

 

Predictability

If you enjoy this article click here to get a copy of one of the “The Ten Truths” books for business owners for free

I read Verne Harnish ‘Mastering the Rockefeller Habits’ on camping holiday a year and half ago.

Thinking about the Rhythm of business and focusing on making business as predictable as possible, Verne relates how the famous John D Rockefeller had lunch with his key people, every day. Verne says: “Consciously or not, Rockefeller understood that the word company means: To Share Bread. He knew that by gathering his top people every day for a meal that their professional and personal relationships would be strengthened.”

I love that quote by Verne Harnish, because I think it is really useful be reminded what the word company actually means. It is absolutely about a group of people – we are in company with people, we don’t create and run a company on our own, it is all about the people.

1001 Business Bedtime stories… Michael Cleans Carpets and Builds Dashboards

1001 Business Bedtime stories…… Truth 3, Finger on The Pulse

Truth 3, Planning
Little richard measures and plans his business

Here follows another one of the “1001 Business Bedtime Stories” … Every story comes straight from the New Perspectives Small Business Bootcamp, stories of business and courage and they illustrate an aspect of one of The Ten Truths… You might recognise some of them from your own experience.

Once upon a time… a long long time ago in a country not unlike Australia… Michael had a carpet cleaningbusiness …

Michael owned a carpet cleaning business in Sydney. Michael had 10 vans on the road with carpet cleaning equipment and Michael would book the jobs and do the marketing and generally run the company.

Michael’s life was full of crises, in fact most of his days involved extinguishing brush fires and he would never know where the next crisis would come from. Most of the crises involved his staff not delivering the customer service or quality that Michael’s clients expected and the only way to manage these issues was by Michael going out and fixing the problems himself.

There were many factors at play of course but Michael found it difficult to keep his staff accountable to specific performance criteria on quality and customer service. How do you measure the quality of a cleaning job and how do you measure the level of customer service and satisfaction you have delivered? But as the saying goes, you can’t manage what you don’t measure.

“If only I had a simple way to measure “Good Work” and “Good Service” that I can apply across the board and use to manage the performance of the guys ?” kept going round and round in Michael’s head.
Michael was at the end of his tether.

The Bootcamp

Working in The Bootcamp with me, Michael learnt that you can create relative measures for intangible things. For example If you were asked to give a score out of ten how happy you felt at this moment, where “10” was that you felt delirious and “0” meant that you were at risk of self harming, you might say “6”. If I were to ask the same question again tomorrow you might answer with “7”. This would lead us to reach a valid conclusion on your state of happiness tomorrow relative to today.

This same principle can be used to measure all sorts of intangible things in life and lends itself really well to measure quality and service and satisfaction levels.

We went to work to create a self scoring system, where a staff-member filled in a small form at the end of each job in which he gave himself and the just completed job a series of scores out of 100 on a number of different measures (for example: “Give yourself a score out of 100 for being punctual”)

The forms would be collated in a spreadsheet and the numbers averaged for each staff member and for the business as a whole. Every week on Monday morning Michael received a report from his admin assistant with the average performance numbers across the company for service and quality in the last week. At the same time Michael had his assistant call 10% of all clients every week and ask them to rate the completed jobs in a similar manner and these ratings were listed side by side with the staff member’s own ratings. The staff members would be given access to the customer ratings as well and as required Michael would sit down with individual staff members, compare notes and generally help the staff improve on their ratings and become more accurate in their self-scores.

This scoring system completely changed the way Michael thought about managing his business and he realised that the way to build a great company and great business value was to step back and create management systems, scoreboards and dashboards.

So she did… and it took a lot of courage… Michael created 3 different weekly dashboards: one for operations, one for marketing and one for finances.

Now 5 years later Michael is negotiating to sell his business. The price he is likely to sell for  is at least 3 times what he would have been able to sell it for a few years back, because now he is selling a business that operates almost independently from Michael himself.

And Michael as well as the new owners of Michael’s business will live happily ever after… The End

Ask yourself… Where will you find the courage to make Profound things happen in your Business?

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